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Trick-Poker

Trick 1 South led the 9 of clubs.  North, who appreciated the important of the turn-up card, won with the Queen of clubs.  This was North’s best poker play, although it suffers from the defect that it reduces North’s chance of declaring four Queens, and it informs South that virtually he has no hope of a sequence because North would hardly play a sequence card if he lacked a duplicate.  North exchanged the 7 of Clubs for the turn-up card, and scored 10 points.  He drew the King of Clubs (giving him no less than four of the five sequence cards), and South the 9 of Hearts.

            Trick 2 North led the 9 of Diamonds, and South played the 7 of Hearts.  North declared the royal marriage and scored 40 points, making his total 50 points.  North drew the King of Hearts, and South the Ace of Hearts.

            Trick 3 North led the 7 of Hearts, and South played the 9 of Diamonds.  North declared the common marriage in Hearts and scored 20 points, making his total 70 points.  North drew the Ace of Clubs, and South the Jack of Hearts.
            Trick 4 North now held a sequence, but, in order to declare it, he had first to win a trick.  A Heart must be led, and he chose the Queen.  Undoubtedly it was the best lead.  The Ace of Hearts is not a good lead, because, if trumped, it will cost North a brisque; and it is better for North to save for four Kings, instead of for four Queens, because not only does it gain 20 more points, but North had already poker played a Queen so the chance of drawing a Queen was slightly less than that of drawing a King.  South played the 9 of Hearts.  North declared his Ace, 10 and Jack of Clubs, and scored 250 points for the sequence, giving him a total of 320 points.  South had not yet scored.  North drew the 10 of Spades, and South the Jack of Diamonds.
            At this point the hands were:

Trick 5 North’s trumps were no longer of vital importance to him, and could be played if desired.  The two Kings were important because North had made up his mind to save for Kings, and it is an error of tactics to  change’s one’s mind during the game.  The Aces and 10s were important, because they furnish brisques.  So North led the Jack of Clubs.  South had a poker bezique in his hand, but unfortunately he could not win the trick and declare it.  The best he could do was to play the Jack of Hearts.  North drew the 8 of Diamonds, and South the Queen of Diamonds.

Trick 6 North led the 8 of Diamonds.  South won with the 10 of Diamonds, putting away a brisque for himself, and declared bezique.  South’s 40 points for bezique was his first score, and he was a long way behind North’s 320 points.  South drew the 10 of hearts, and North the Ace of Clubs.

Trick 7 South now had the lead.  He chose the 7 of Clubs and scored 10 points, making his total 50.  it was the best lead, because the lead of either Heart would probably be trumped and a brisque lost.  He had to save for four Queens, and the Jack of Diamonds was out of the question since there was always the possibility of declaring double bezique.  North was more or less compelled to win with the Queen of Clubs.  North drew the 8 of Diamonds, and South the Queen of Spades.

Trick 8 North led the 8 of Diamonds, and South won with the 8 of Cluns and declared four Queens (60 points) giving him a total of 110.  North, with a total of 320 points, was still well ahead, but he noted with some concern that South would be able to declare double bezique if he was lucky enough to flush draw the other Jack of Diamonds.  South drew the 9 of Spades, and North the 8 of Spades.

Trick 9 South led the 9 of Spades, and North won with the 10 of Spades.  North drew the Jack of Spades, and South the 8 of Spades. 

Trick 10 North led the 8 of Spades, and South played the other 8 of Spades.  North drew the 8 of Hearts, and South the Jack of Hearts.

Trick 11 North led the 8 of Hearts, and South won with the 10 of Hearts.  South drew the King of Diamonds, and North the 8 of Hearts.
At this point the hands were:


            The score was North 320 points, South 110 points.
            Trick 12 South led the Jack of Hearts, and North played the 8.  it would not have been good poker play for North to win with the Ace of Hearts because, though this would have given him a brisque, it is better for North to save for four Aces now that he held three.  South laid down his King of Diamonds and scored a common marriage (20 points), giving him a total of 130 points.  South drew the 7 of spades, and North the Ace of Spades.

Trick 13  South led the 7 of Spades.  North won with the Jack of Spades, and declared four Aces (100 points).  This raised his total to 420, and he had a good lead on South, whose score was only 130 points.  North drew the jack of Clubs, and South the 9 of Spades.
The hands were now:

and south’s poker hand with its three bezique cards was not without possibilities.
Trick 14 North led the Jack of Clubs, and South played the 9 of Spades.  North drew the Jack of Spades, and South the 9 of Hearts.

Trick 15 North led the Jack of Spades, and South played the 9 of Hearts.  North drew the King of Clubs, and South the Jack of Diamonds.

Trick 16 Now, of course, the whole game changed, because South held a double bezique, though he had to win a trick before he could declare it.  If the stock is nearly exhausted it is proper for North to lead the Ace of Spades, hoping that it would not be trumped, and South, who had no trump in his hand, discarded the married Queen of Diamonds.  North drew the 10 of Diamonds, and South the 10 of Clubs, a vital card.

Trick 17 North, who by this time suspected that South held double bezique, led the Ace of Hearts, hoping that South would still not be able to trump.  This time, however, he was doomed to disappointment, because, of course, South was able to win with the 10 of Clubs and declare double bezique.  The score of 500 points for double bezique raised South’s total to 630 and gave him a led of 210 points because North’s score was only 420 points.  South drew the Ace of Spades, and North the King.

Trick 18 South, who had no further use for his poker bezique Jacks, led a Jack of Diamonds.  North won with the 10 of Diamonds and declared four Kings (80 points), raising his score to 500 points.
Trick 19 North drew the 9 of Clubs, and South played the Jack of Diamonds.  North led the 9 of Clubs, and South played the Jack of Diamonds.  North drew the 8 of Clubs, and South the Ace of Diamonds.
            The hands were now:


PLATE 8  The layout for shah.

Trick 20 North now suspected that South was on the point of declaring four Aces.  His tactics, therefore, had to be aggressive, and, since the other 10 of Clubs had been played, his trumps were all winners, and he played them to prevent South from declaring.  North led the Ace of Clubs, and South played the Queen of Spades.  North drew one 7 of Diamonds and South the other.

 

 

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