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Introduction
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Games you Can Play
General Rules
Imperfect Deck
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Draw Poker
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Draw Poker
General Rules of Poker
Stander Hand Rank of Poker
Basic Draw Poker Rule
Draw Poker Variation
Low and High-Low Variation
Spit Card Variants Poker
Miscellaneous Draw Poker Variants

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Stud Poker
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Stud Poker
Five Card Stud Variation
Miscellaneous Stud Poker Variants
General Poker strategy
Possible Poker Hands
Paring your Hole Card

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Rummy Games
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Rummy Games
Six Seven Card Straight
PIF-PAF
Six Seven Card Knock Rummy
Coon Can
Five Hundred Rummy
Continental Rummy
Fortune Rummy
Kalooki (CALOOCHI)
PAN

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Gin Rummy =================

Gin Rummy
Standard Hollywood Gin Rummy
Jersey Gin

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Canasta
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Canasta
Variation of Canasta
Typical Four-Handed Score Sheet

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Bridge: Contract and Auction =================
Contract and Auction
Contract Bridge Scoring Table
Bridge Poker
Minimum Biddable Suits
CONVENTIONAL LEADS
CHANCES OF VARIOUS SUIT
The Laws of Progressive Contract Bridge
The Laws of Duplicate Contract Bridge
Auction bridge

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Cribbage and How it is Played
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Cribbage how to Play
Strategy at Cribbage

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Casino
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Casino
Strategy at Casino

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Children and Family Card Games
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Family Card Games
Old Maid
Animals or menagerie
TWENTY –ONE

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Miscellaneous Card Games
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Miscellaneous Card Games
Briscola
Primiera
Scotch whist
Lift smoke
Preference
Grand
Crazy eights

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Solitaire and Patience Games =================

Solitaire and Patience Games
Single-deck solitaire
Decade
Auld Lang Syne
Klondike
Four Seasons
Beleaguered Castle
Trefoil
Poker Solitaire
Two-deck solitaire
Tournament
Multiple solitaires

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Chess, Checkers, and Teeko
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Chess
Checkers
Teeko
Standard Teeko Strategy
Start Teeko Game
Standard Checkers Law

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Parlor Games for All
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Parlor Games
Twenty Questions

HASAMI SHOGI

This very popular Japanese game, generally called just Show, is played on a board of nine by nine squares and each player has 18 pieces of his own color.  They are placed on the two back rows.  The rules generally followed for Shogi are as follows:

  1. No diagonal moves are permitted.
  2. A piece cannot land on a square occupied by another piece.
  3. A piece can jump over an adjacent piece to land on a vacant square and an occupied square in the same move.
  4. When a player traps an opposing pice between two of his pieces on a rank or file (custodian capture), it is removed from the board.
  5. A piece may move between two enemy pieces safely.
  6. A player wins the poker game when he has five men in a row on a file, rank, or diagonally, excluding the two home rows.

HALMA

This game was invented about 1880 in  England and immediately became popular in that country and Europe.
            Requirements

  1. Two to four players, each playing for himself.
  2. The board is square of 16 by 16 small checked squares.  At each corner heavy lines mark an enclosure of 13 squares, and in two diagonally opposite corners additional lines increase the enclosure 19 squares.
  3. The pieces are counters like checker men, though smaller in order to fit the smaller square of the Halma board.  Each player is given 13 pieces (in a four-hand game) or 19 pieces (in a two-hand game ) in distinctive colors.

The Object of the Game.  Each player tries to move all of his pieces across the board to the corner enclosure diagonally opposite that from which he started.  The first player to do so wins the game.

            The Play.  A draw of lots determines who plays first.  Players take alternate turns.  With three or more players, the turns move in a clockwise direction from the left of the person who goes first.  A player may move only one of his pieces on each turn.  A move may be made by either a step or a hop, but never a combination of the two.  The step is a move to an adjacent square in any direction, vertical, horizontal, or diagonal forward or backward.  A hop move like a jump in Checkers may be made in any direction over an adjacent piece to a vacant square just beyond the same line.  As in Checkers, the hopping move once started may be continued as long as the piece finds others to jump.  But in Halma, a piece may hop over friendly as well as enemy pieces and the pieces jumped are not captured.  No pieces are ever removed from the board.  Furthermore, it is not compulsory to jump when able having started a series of hops, the piece may come to rest at any time the player wishes, though additional hops would be possible.

 

H1


The Halma board (left) and Chinese Checker board (right)

 

            Strategy in Halma.  The best way to move the pieces across the board is to form “ladders” from the starting base to the goal, and to advance rearmost pieces as frequently as possible by hops up the ladder.  When enemy forces meet in the center of the board, every effort should be made to block, or at least to avoid helping the opponent.

Chinese Checkers

Chinese Checkers is a modern version of Hlama.
            Requirements

  1. Two to six players, each playing for himself.
  2. A Chinese Checker board, which is in the form  of a six-pointed star.
  3. Ninety marbles in six colors; 15 of each color.

Object of the Game.  Each player attempts to move all his pieces from one of the six points of the star into the opposite point of the star before any opponent  can do so.
            The Play.  If two are playing, they take seats opposite one another and each player positions 15 marbles of a single color in the point of the star in front of him – opposite his opponent’s point.  If three or more play, ten marbles are used instead of 15;  these are grouped within  any point of the star a player selects.  All rules are as in Halma, but due to the hexagonal arrangement, a step can be made in any of six directions, as compared with eight in Halma.

 

MANCALA

 

This game (Manual in Egypt, Palanquin in India and Ceylon, Kalaheo in Syria, Wari in Africa, Awari in Guiana and the Caribbean) may be the world’s oldest game since it can be played using shells or pebbles as counters and in hollows scooped into the earth.  Although it is played by primitive peoples throughout the world it is a wholly mathematical game (somewhat similar to but much more complicated than the Match Game), and its more complex versions have been ranked with Chess as an intellectual exercise.
            Mancala was being played in Egypt before 1400 B.C.; stone boards have been found at Memphis, Thebes, and Luxor.  Sometimes called the African national game, it is played throughout that continent under a great many different tribal names.  While the boards and the number of pieces used vary, the so-called two-rank Mancala board which contains two parallel rows of six holes (called pits) is the most commonly used.  There are usually two larger holes (called scoring pits ) at each end of the board.

            Mancala boards have recently been put on the market in the United States, and I give here only one of the commonest and simplest methods of play.
            Requirements

  1. Two players.
  2. A two-rank Mancala board.
  3. 36 or 72 counters, called pebbles,  or seeds.

The Play.  The two players sit behind the two ranks of six pits on the board between them.  Each pit contains three  (for beginners) or six (for experienced players) pebbles.  Object of the game is to accumulate as many pebbles as possible in the scoring pit (mancala ) to each player’s right.  Each player in turn picks up all the pebbles in any one of his own six pits and sows them, one of his own six pits and sows them, one in each pit, around the board to the right, including, if there are enough, his own mancala and on into his opponent’s pits (but not his opponent’smancala).  If the player’s last counter lands in his own scoring pit, he gets another turn, and if it lands in an empty pit on his own side, he captures all his opponent’s counters in the opposite pit and puts them in his mancala together with the capturing pebbles.  The game is over when all six pits on one side or another are empty.  It is not always an advantage for a player to go “out,” since all pebbles in the pits on the opposite side go into the opponent’s scoring pit.  The score is determined by who has the most pebbles.  That is, the difference  between the two amounts is the number of points won.  Forty points is usually the deciding score for a series of games.

            Mancala Strategy.  A sophisticated player learns not to accept all short-term advantage, however tempting.  Thus, in the game illustrated, player A began by moving the three pebbles in his pit A 4, ending in his mancala and thus earning another move, which he used to play form pit A 4 and thereby capturing B’s men.  By similar maneuvers and captures.  A, by the fourth turn, has become pebble proud, with eleven in his mancala to a pathetic one in B’s (see diagram).  But A is dangerously concentrated in the two pits A 5and A6.  B, seeding six pebbles on his own side, forces A to start distributing his hoard around the board.  By the eighth turn (see diagram) A still has 12 in his scoring pit to five in B’s; but B moves the five pebbles in B2 and then has sonly to move the single pebble in his pit B1 to capture A’s seven remaining pebbles ending the game and winning it by a score of 24 to 12.  Thus B receives 12 points toward the total score of 40 for his victory.

H2

The Mancala board  (top) set a up for start of game.  Each player in turn picks up all in one  of his own pits and sows them to the right.  Game ends when one player’s  pits are empty.  Player with the most pebbles wins.  In the sample game (center), A11, A1-B6-A-4-A3, A2, A1.  After move A1 (bottom ), B4, B6, and B1-A4-B3-A6-B2. 
The latter is B’s winning move.

FOX AND GEESE

This old English game, which dates back to about 1450, can be played with one or more players.  Let’s first look at a two-player version.
            Requirements

  1. Two players.
  2. A Fox and Geese board such as illustrated here.  (Disregard letters and numbers shown on edge of illustration as they apply only to Peg Solitaire.)
  3. Seventeen white marbles (the geese) and one black marbe (the fox).

The Play.  A draw of lots determines which player is the fox and who is the geese.  The online poker player who is the geese arranges his 17 white marbles on the board as shown, and the fox is placed on any vacant point.  The player representing the fox makes the first move and from then on the moves alternate.  The fox can move in any direction along a line to the next contiguous point, but the geese may move only sideways or forward not backward.  If the fox jumps over a goose, as in Checkers, and lands on an empty point beyond, the goose is killed and is removed from the board.  Two or more geese can be killed in one move by a series of short jumps by the fox.  The geese cannot jump over the fox, but they try to crowd him into a corner and make it impossible for him to move.  If the fox is immobilized he loses the game, but if he can remove the geese from the board before they can trap him he wins.

h3         h4

The Fox and Geese board set for the two-player game (left) and the solitaire version (right)

 

Peg Solitaire.  This game is played with a Fox and Geese board, but 32 marbles are used Color of marbles is unimportant.  To records solution of Peg Solitaire poker game.
            The Play.  The marbles are so arranged that the center spot (D4) is left blank.  Then at each turn of play one marble must jump over an adjacent marble into a vacant hole beyond.  The marble passed over is removed.  All jumps must be vertical or horizontal never diagonal.  The object of the game is to remove all the marbles from the board except one, and this should be left in the central hole.
            Here’s one  way that it can be done:

1.

D2 into

D4 remove

D3

17

C2 into

C4 remove

C3

2.

F3

D3

E3

18.

A3

C3

B3

3.

E1

E3

E2

19.

DE

B3

C3

4.

E4

E2

E3

20.

A5

A3

A4

5.

C1

E1

D1

21.

A3

C3

B3

6.

E1

E3

E2

22.

D5

D3

D4

7.

E6

E4

E5

23.

D3

B3

C3

8.

G5

E5

F5

24.

B3

B5

B4

9.

D5

F5

E5

25.

B5

D5

C5

10.

G3

G5

G4

26.

D5

F5

E5

11.

G5

E5

F5

27.

F4

D4

E4

12.

B5

D5

C5

28.

C4

E4

D4

13.

C7

C5

C6

29.

E3

E5

E4

14.

C4

C6

C5

30.

F5

D5

E5

15.

E7

C7

D7

31.

D6

D4

D5

16.

C7

C5

C6

 

 

 

 

This sequence of moves leave the last marble in the  center, D4.  Other problems can be set and solved in similar ways.

SOLITAIRE

 

In the eighteenth century, the French game of Solitaire, known as Pegboard, was invented, according to legend, by a French count while a prisoner in the Bastille during the French revolution.  It is a form of patience for one player similar to Fox and Geese.

            Requirements

  1. One players.
  2. A square board with 37 holes, arranged as shown.  In each hole is placed a peg.

an image
The Solitaire board and its numbers.

The play.  One Peg of the 37 is removed.  Then one peg at a time is jumped over another into a vacant hole, the peg so jumped being removed from the board.  As in the Fox and Geese solitaire game, all jumps must be vertical or horizontal never diagonal.  Many problems may be created and worked out with a Pegboard.  Here are two simple one:

            First Problem.  Peg 1 being removed, to leave the last peg in hole 37.

3-1

20-7

18-20

12-2

9-11

20-33

13-3

16-18

33-31

15-13

23-25

2-12

4-6

22-20

8-6

18-5

29-27

6-19

1-11

18-31

19-32

31-18

31-33

36-26

18-5

34-32

30-32

20-7

20-33

26-36

3-13

37-27

35-37

33-20

5-18

 

Second Problem.   Peg 19 being removed, to leave only hole 19 and all outer holes occupied.

6-19

26-24

29-27

4-6

35-25

14-28

18-5

24-26

27-29

6-4

27-25

19-21

9-11

33-31

7-20

24-10

25-35

21-19

11-9

 

 

 

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AMERICAN WHIST =================

AMERICAN WHIST
BID WHIST
VINT
BOSTON
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Pinochle Many Variations
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Pinochle Many Variations
Two-Handed Pinochle
Two-Handed Doubling Redoubling
Auction pinochle
Strategy at Auction
CAD found
Partnership Auction
Auction pinochle without wido Individual play
Partnership Aeroplane Pinochle
Radio Partnership Pinochle

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Other Members of the Bezique Family

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The Bezique Family
Rubicon bezique
Two-handed sixty-six
Two-handed piquet
Imperial
Jass
Boo-Ray or BOURÉ

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The Big Euchre Family
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The big euchre family
Strategy of euchre
Auction euchre
Table of scoring points
Napoleon
Spoil five
Double hasenpfeffer
Ecarte
Three-card loo
Schafkopf

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The Heart Group
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Heart Group
Spot Hearts
Black Widow Hearts

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The All-Fours Group
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All-Fours Group
Shasta Sam
Auction Pitch Joker
Razzle-Dazzle

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Banking Card Games
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Banking Card Games
Black Jack, Casino Style
Black Jack Strategy
Pontoon
CHEMIN DE FER
CHEMIN DE PER must play
Baccarat Banque
Faro or farobank
ZIGINETTE
CHINESE FAN-TAN
Banker and broker
Red Dogs


Card craps
Lottery
TRENTE ET QUARANTE

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The Stops Games
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Stops Game
SNIP-SNAP-;SNOREM
ENFLE
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Skarney® and How It Is Played
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Skarney® and How It Is Played
Alternate Skarney
Skarney Singles
SKARNEY GIN ®
Skarney Gin Doubles

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Cheating at Card Games
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Cheating at Card Games
Professional Card Cheats
Nullifying the Cut
The Peek
How to Shuffle Cards

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Dice and their Many Games
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Dice and their Many Games
The Casino Game: Bank Craps
THE CASINO’S LPERCENTAGE OF BANK CRAPS BETS
SCARNE’S RULES FOR OTHER DICE GAMES
English Hazard
Hooligan
General
Double Cameroon
Partnership Straight scarney Dice
Scarney Duplicate Jackpots
Scarney Chemin de Fer

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Games Requiring Special Equipment
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Backgammon
Parcheesi
Hasami Shogi
Scarney
Follow The Arrow
Roulette

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Lottery and Guessing Games
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Lottery guessing game
Tossing Game
Race Horse Keno
Moko
The Match Game

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Glossary of Game Terms
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glossary
glossary1
glossary2
glossary3

 

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