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Introduction
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Games you Can Play
General Rules
Imperfect Deck
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Draw Poker
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Draw Poker
General Rules of Poker
Stander Hand Rank of Poker
Basic Draw Poker Rule
Draw Poker Variation
Low and High-Low Variation
Spit Card Variants Poker
Miscellaneous Draw Poker Variants

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Stud Poker
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Stud Poker
Five Card Stud Variation
Miscellaneous Stud Poker Variants
General Poker strategy
Possible Poker Hands
Paring your Hole Card

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Rummy Games
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Rummy Games
Six Seven Card Straight
PIF-PAF
Six Seven Card Knock Rummy
Coon Can
Five Hundred Rummy
Continental Rummy
Fortune Rummy
Kalooki (CALOOCHI)
PAN

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Gin Rummy =================

Gin Rummy
Standard Hollywood Gin Rummy
Jersey Gin

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Canasta
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Canasta
Variation of Canasta
Typical Four-Handed Score Sheet

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Bridge: Contract and Auction =================
Contract and Auction
Contract Bridge Scoring Table
Bridge Poker
Minimum Biddable Suits
CONVENTIONAL LEADS
CHANCES OF VARIOUS SUIT
The Laws of Progressive Contract Bridge
The Laws of Duplicate Contract Bridge
Auction bridge

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Cribbage and How it is Played
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Cribbage how to Play
Strategy at Cribbage

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Casino
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Casino
Strategy at Casino

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Children and Family Card Games
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Family Card Games
Old Maid
Animals or menagerie
TWENTY –ONE

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Miscellaneous Card Games
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Miscellaneous Card Games
Briscola
Primiera
Scotch whist
Lift smoke
Preference
Grand
Crazy eights

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Solitaire and Patience Games =================

Solitaire and Patience Games
Single-deck solitaire
Decade
Auld Lang Syne
Klondike
Four Seasons
Beleaguered Castle
Trefoil
Poker Solitaire
Two-deck solitaire
Tournament
Multiple solitaires

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Chess, Checkers, and Teeko
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Chess
Checkers
Teeko
Standard Teeko Strategy
Start Teeko Game
Standard Checkers Law

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Parlor Games for All
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Parlor Games
Twenty Questions

PARCHEESI

Parcheesi (also spelled Pachisi, Parchisi, Parchesi) is a variation of Backgammon originating in India and it is the national game of that country.  The Indian  Emperor Akbar, I am told, played Parcheesi in a truly regal fashion on courts constructed of inlaid marble. In the center of the court was a dais four feet high on which the Emperor and his courtiers sat, while 16 young, beautiful slave girls from the harem, wearing appropriate colors, moved about the squares as directed by the throws of cowrie shells. While the rules have not changed since the emperor’s day, the equipment surely has: dice have replaced the cowrie shells, a small board is used rather than huge marble courts, and unfortunately, counters have taken the place of the girls.

 

Requirements

  1. Two to four players.
  2. A Parcheesi board, plus 16 counters in four colors (four of each color) and one pair of dice and a dice cup for each player.

Object of the Game. Each player attempts to get four counters into the inner center of the board before any other player can do so.
The Play. After the seating has been arranged and the color of the counters selected, a single die is cast by each player and high throw wins the first move. If there is a tie, the die is cast again until the tie is broken. The players take turns, in a clockwise direction.
On each of his turns, a player throws the two dice from the dice cup. In order to move a counter from the home circle, a five must appear on at least one of the dice (not as the sum of the dice). When a five is cast, a player may move one counter onto the colored space just next to his home base. If double fives are rolled, two pieces may be moved out at the same time; or one counter may be moved out, and then it may be moved five spaces forward or some other man, already out, may be moved five spaces forward. At any time during the poker game a player who casts a doublet moves his counters the proper number of spaces forward and throws the dice again. (Variation: Some play that if a player throws three consecutive doublets, he must return his counter that is farthest around the board to the home circle. He must also pass the turn to the player on his left.)


The dice are played as two separate counts, as in Backgammon. That is, if a player casts a three and a four, he may move one counter three spaces and another four spaces, or he may move one piece seven spaces. But, no more than two pieces may be located on one space at the same time. Two counters of the same color on the same space block passage past that point to any piece coming up behind. A player may move two counters per turn, and should he throw a doublet, he may move two counters into a side-by-side blocking position. Where a block occurs ahead and the number on the dice would carry any player’s piece up to, or beyond the block, that player may not move his counter forward even one space. Example: If a block lies on a space five units ahead and the roll of the dice yields five or more, the player may not move the counter at all. Remember that a player may not jump over his own block or an opponent’s until he or his opponent moves one or both of the men out of a blocking position.
Where one counter is located on a space, an opposing piece landing squarely on that space sends the first man back to his home circle. That is, if an opponent’s man lies five spaces ahead and a player rolls a five on one die-or a combination on both dice add up to exactly five-he moves up his counter, replacing the opposing man and sending him back to his home circle. A counter sent home in this way cannot reenter the game until the player throws a five-as at the start of play. There are safe bases located about the board-generally blue-colored spaces. A counter located on one of these spaces cannot be sent home, regardless of whether an opponent lands a piece next to his.

After going around the rest of the board, a player’s counters enter the center of the board through .the avenue just to the left of his home circle. Once inside this avenue, a player’s men cannot be attacked by an opponent’s men. Pieces are moved in the avenue in the same manner as they are around the rest of the board. But, no counter can enter the inner circle unless the exact number of spaces necessary to do so appears on one of the dice or as the sum of both dice. Therefore, a piece lying four spaces from the inner circle can move into the circle only if a four or some combination adding up to four is rolled. If a three is thrown, the piece can be moved up to the first space of the avenue. However, the only way this counter can enter the inner circle is if a one comes up on a die on a subsequent turn; a two or some higher number does not permit a move into the inner circle. Of course, as previously stated, the first player to move all his counters into the inner circle wins the game.

 

MILL

This ancient game, which is also known by such names as Nine Men’s Morris, Morelles, Muhle, and Morris, is still one of Europe’s most popular board games.
            Requirements

  1. Two players.
  2. A board such as illustrated here.  There are 24 points arranged in 16 lines of three points each.  (The diagonal lines, such as 1-4-7, are usually omitted in the modern game.)
  3. Eighteen counters in two contrasting colors, nine for each player.  Ordinary poker chips or checkers will serve.

The Play.  A draw of lots or toss of a coin determines who plays first.  Play then alternates.  Each player places one counter in turn upon any of the 24 points of the board.  When all 18 pieces have been placed, play continues by alternate moves.  A piece may move to an adjacent vacant point on the same line.
The object, both in laying pieces on the board and in moving them, is to get three pieces of one’s own color in a horizontal or vertical  (not diagonal) line.  Such an arrangement is called a mill.  On making a mill, the player may remove any one adverse piece from the board provided that it is not part of a mill, unless there are no others on the layout.  Once a piece is removed from the board, it is dead and never returns into play.
A mill may be opened by moving a piece off the line: closing it by moving the piece back counts as a separate mill, and entitles the player to remove another adverse piece.  Example:  Black has a mill on 1-2-3.  If he is able to move 3-15; then 15-3, he is entitled to remove a White counter.

The player who is first reduced to two pieces, or who is first to be unable to move in his turn, loses the game.  (An optional rule is that when a player is reduced to three pieces he may move “wild” from any point to any point, regardless of the lines.)
Strategy of Mill.  If White, playing first, takes one of the best points, as 5, Black can prevent the formation of a mill only by playing on an adjacent point, as 2,4,6, or 8.  But more enterprising is to take another of the four key points, as 14, because White will lose by block if he immediately plays for a fork (a simultaneous attack on two enemy pieces), thus:

White

Black

5

14

8

2

7

9

12

16

11

10

4

6

19

 

           
Whatever piece White removes, Black replaces, and then White has to block at 21 and Black at 20.  Now all of White’s eight pieces are immobile, being held by  Black’s seven.  Wherever White puts his last piece, Black can play adjacent and then run down this only free  enemy.  Thus even if the player who forces an early mill does not run into a complete block, his extra pieces by no means assures victory.  In the following game, for instance, Black after becoming a piece up made a mistake and actually lost, but with the best of play poker he could do not move than draw.  Thus:

White

Black

5

14

21

11

2

8

17

23

12

13

15

9

7

18(7)

7

16

1

3

1-10

14-21

15-14

23-22

5-41

8-5

7-8

etc

White now maintains his pieces on 8, 14, and 17, keeping the Black mill closed, and his other five pieces can meet all threats exerted by Black’s six, without suffering paralysis.  If seems as though the loss of a pieces is an advantage to white in that it gives him room to maneuver.  But it does not follow that a mill made by force in laying down the pieces is useless.  On the contrary, it will usually bring victory if delayed just long enough so that the opponent runs out of pieces before he can blockade it.  For instance:

White

Black

5

14

20

11

1

18

7

23 ?

 

            Black’s last move is a mistake.  His policy of scattering his pieces to occupy many lines is correct- probably the game is intrinsically a draw if this policy is accurately  carried out by both players but here he should play 2 or 8 to intercept the White constellation.  There follows:

White

Black

6

4

19

21

8

2

9 (2)

2

15

13

7-12

Any

12-7 (2)

 

Whitewins as he now has two mills.


The Mill board (left).  The illustration at the right shows that black has a double mill (2-5 and 5-2)

 

            If each side makes one mill, the game is usually won by the first to open.  The play is likely to be a matter of alternate captures, hence the name Mill (German Muhle, grinder)- the forces are ground down slowly  but surely.  But the player behind at the outset can sometimes overtake his opponent by collateral threats, especially the formation of a second mill.  The ideal to be striven for is the doubtemill, which grinds down the enemy in a hurry.  Example: White pieces on 1,2,3,4, 6.  By moving 2-5 and 5-2, White closes a mill at each turn.
            As has been mentioned previously, the game is probably a draw with the best play on both sides.  The drawing policy is to scatter the pieces so as to intercept on all possible lines.  This is also the way to lure the opponent in traps, such as self-destruction though forcing the play too soon.

 

GO OR WEI-CHI

Go, or Wei-Chi, the great Chinese game of skill, is played by millions of peop0le throughout the Orient and is considered by most Oriental game experts as the world’s greatest strategic skill game, far surpassing Chess in scope.  Go, if we are to believe Chinese history, was invented by Emperor Shun (2255-2206 B.C.) to help develop the mental faculties of his son, Shokin A second  version ascribes the invention of Wei-Chi to U, a subject of Emperor Kieh Kwei, who lived several hundred years later.  Anyone’s guess is as good as mine.  However, I would venture to say that the second version is more likely to be the truth.  Emperors, even in the old days B.C., had enough problems ruling a country without devoting years to inventing a great skill game.
            History further records that in the tenth century B.C., Wei-Chi was well known, because it is mentioned in a number of poems and allegories found in Chinese literature dating from the period.
            The first books devoted entirely to Wei-Chi were written during the T’ang dynasty sometime in the years 618-906.  In the year 754, the Chinese Emperor Hinan Tsung presented a Wei-Chi game set to the Japanese Emperor Koken Tenno through  the latter’s representative, Kididaijin.  The Japanese named it go, spelled phonetically Go.  This name has been generally used by the few thousand people in America, Europe, and South America who play the game.   Go is definitely a modern military game.  Its object is territorial conquest and the capture of opponent’s stones by encirclement.  The stones with which the game is played do not have a single capture objective as in Chess, but an overall objective that is made up of many captures, and the final result hinges on the strategic disposition of a large number of stones and on the proper timing of their activities.  The different ways the stones are played on to the board seem to give rise to a greater variety of combinations than might be found in Chess, and  unlike Chess, all men in Go are alike in shape.  An average game of Go lasts about as long as the average game of Chess.

Requirements

        1. Two players.
        2. Each player has a set of stones (181 in number).  One set is colored black and the other white, a total of 362 stones.  The stones have the shape of convex lenses about 7/8 of an inch in diameter and 1/8 to ½ inch in thickness.
        3. The board: Go is played on a rectangular board (Go-Ban) on which 19 equidistant line are drawn paralled to one edge and 19 at right angles to them, as shown here.  These lines are about 15/16 inch apart from each other in one direction and 7/8 inch in the other.  A margin of about ½ inch runs around all the board’s four edges.  The board is placed between both players with its narrow sides running vertically.  A Go set may be improvised by using small poker chips or buttons as stones and drawing 19 by 19 lines on a cardboard.  The distance between lines should be slightly larger than the diameter of the poker chips or buttons in use.

            To aid the reader to understand at a glance the structure and formation of the stone set-ups on the Go game board that follow, a lettered and numbered Go game board is shown below.  The vertical lines are names A, B, C, etc., to T, omitting the I., beginning from the left of the player of the Black  stones.  The horizontal lines are numbered from 1 to 19, beginning from the side of the same player.  A point of intersection called a point is simply defined by listing the letter and numbers of the lines concerned.



The Go board.  Note the little dots on the intersections of the forth, tenth, and sixteenth lines with lines D, K, and Q.  These nine points are called “tars” or “handicap points.”

            The determination of positions on the board is simplified by little dots on the inter-sections of the fourth, tenth, and sixteenth line with lines D, K and Q.  These nine points are called handicap points, or stars.  This is one of the inherent advantages of the structure of Go because these handicap points help compensate for any disparity in the contestant’s degree of skill by permitting the weaker player to place one or more stones on the handicap points before the play begins.
            The Object of the Game.  The object of the game is  place his stones on the board so as to completely surround more unoccupied territory and opponent stones than does his opponent.  When the game ends, each player scores the number of points (intersections of two lines) situated in his territory, minus the number of stones he has lost to his opponent.  The player with the higher score wins the game and scores the point difference between his score and that of his opponent.  Should both players have identical scores, the game is a tie.

            The Rules of Play

  1. The board is vacant to start the game.  Each player takes 181 stones of one color.  The players, called Black and White, have the privilege of moving alternately, with Black always making the first move in the starting of the game.  A move consists of placing a stone on any unoccupied point, with the two exceptions noted in  rule 3.  Once placed, a stone is never again moved during the game, unless it is captured by the opponent.  A play consist of placing a stone not on the square formed by the lines on the board but on the points of intersection of these lines.  There are 361 points on the board.
  2. The idea is for a player to place his stones so that they form connected groups – also called chiantis which surround as many unoccupied points and opponent’s stones as possible.  If all of the intersections (points) adjacent to a stone or a group of stones are occupied by stones of the opposite color, that stone or group of stones is captured and removed from the board immediately.  (Such adjacent points are referred to as breathing spaces.)
  3. A player is not permitted to make a move which results in the repetition of a position reached previously, nor is he permitted to play on any point which is completely surrounded stones, because it is against the rules of the game for any stone to remain on the board if it is completely surrounded by stones of the opposite color.  A point which is completely surrounded by stones of the opposite color is called an eye.  If a group of stones contains two separate eyes, it is always safe from capture, regardless of the enemy stones surrounding the group, because it is not possible for the opponent to occupy either of two eyes.
  4. The game is over when both players decide there are no plays left on the board that can benefit either player.  However, if there is a difference of opinion may pass his turn of play.  when both players pass consecutively, the game ends.

In Chess a game is drawn when the same position is repeated three times.  However, Go rule 3 prevents a repetitive move from resulting in a draw.  To illustrate, the drawing on this page shows in figure A  White stone surrounded on three sides by Black stones and in check.  Black can capture this single stone, and the developed position will be as shown in figure  B.  The result achieved is that a Black stone is now in check.  If, as in figure C, White now captures this Black stone, we are back to the position we started in figure A.  This play could go on indefinitely –which the Japanese call KO, which means eternity.  KO situations occur often in Go, but do not end the game in a draw because of the following rule of play.  In a  situation, after one player has captured an enemy stone, his opponent is not permitted to recapture until he has made one or more plays elsewhere on the board.  This rule not only prevents drawn games but odds excitement and poker strategy to the game, because in their efforts to win a vital KO the players continuously analyze the board for plays which they believe their opponents will be forced to protect, and at times these diverting tactics become more important than the KO itself.  In the elementary KO situation, there is only one stone at stake but in many games the outcome of a KO maneuver often determines the outcome of the game.



The rules of play in Go illustrated

  1. When the game ends, all stones left in enemy territory are considered dead and are removed from the board.  The White player then places his captured Black stones on the vacant points in Black’s territory.  The Black player places his captured White stones on the vacant points in White’s territory.  Last, the total number of vacant points in each territory are counted.  The player with the higher count is declared the winner and scores the point difference between his winning score and his opponent’s losing score.

 Go Strategy.  Playing first gives Black an advantage much greater than it may appear, and in games between experts, it is often decisive.  Many Japanese Go masters to whom I have spoken go as far as to insist that Black’s victory is absolutely certain by moving first.  I do not agree that the first move is that crucial, but it certainly is advantageous.  However, it is best to change colors at the start of each game and balance the play.

            The two opposing arrays of stones as they develop during play are much like soldiers on a battlefield; if a segment is cut off from their main force, they are extremely vulnerable to attack and capture by the opposing force.
            The opening is undoubtedly the most difficult phase of  a Go game.  Even the most proficient experts with years of plaiting experience cannot pass final judgment on some opening maneuvers.  In the opening stages of Go, each player must not only visualize or sketch out the territories he will play for, but in addition each player must deploy his stones in such a manner that they will be capable of defending against enemy attack and at the same time be capable of attacking the enemy stones.



            Most beginners make the mistake of attacking the opponent without adequate preparation.  They try to surround hostile groups wherever they are forming instead of selecting a battle group on which they have at least an even chance of emerging unscathed.  Such a result cannot be expected if they try to attack a strong chain with a few scattered stones.

            In the illustration above, if White plays as indicated in the middle figure, the four Black stones will be cut into two separate groups, either of which can be attacked by White.  On the other hand, if Black plays as indicated in the figure on the right, all his stones are connected into a single chain, and the White stones on either side of the Black chain are in grave danger.  Although stones are not actually connected until they occupy adjacent intersections, there are many loose plays which in effect connect the stones involved because it is impossible for the opponent to prevent their connections.  The illustration above is a good example of such a play.  note White cannot stop the connection of Black’s stones.
            With even the advantage of Black playing first, both players have equal chances to capture territory with their subsequent plays.  It should then be assumed that each player will seek to capture the largest territories possible at the beginning of the game.  What is the best way to accomplish this?  The illustration on the facing page graphically demonstrates this point.  You will note that each of the Black groups has surrounded nine points of territory. 


Although these three Black groups have captured the same amount of territory, they did not do so with the same number of stones.  The corner group contains only seven stones and its investment ratio to gain is 7 to 9.  The Black group on the top side of the board is made up of nine stones, or just as many as the captured points.  In the center of the board, 12 stones were required to capture nine points of territory.  The basic strategy of the opening game is based almost entirely upon results evident in this illustration.  Territory is easiest to capture in the corners of the board because the two edges of the board provide half of the protection required for such territories.  The center of the board is the most difficult area in which to capture territory because it is open on all sides and requires the maximum amount of stones to complete a capture of territory.  Naturally, there are factors other than the mere capture of points to be considered, and a “tendency toward the center” is one of them.  But, the principle expounded in this diagram above is basically true and it has been followed in about 95 percent of all card games ever played.
            A tactical method called a shicho, or ladder, more characteristic  of the middle game than of the opening or end game, is the cutting of an enemy group in two where two where two of its men are joined diagonally rather than connected in a straight line.  In executing such  a cut, a player must be careful not to lose through a shicho the stone which he used for an attack against the part of a hostile chain that has been cut off from the main body.
            Space limitation has forced me to confine myself to a rather sketchy treatment of Go.  But I hope that even the few examples of combinatory and positional play which I have chosen may enable the reader to get a good glimpse of the score and beauty of the game of Go.

 


Partnership Go

Four players play as partners.  Black plays first, then White, then Black, then White , etc.  There can be no discussion between partners are determined by mutual consent.  All the rules for two-handed Go apply to this four-handed variant.

Go Moku or Go Bang

This is a very simple game played on the Go board which is particularly popular among Oriental women and children who prefer a more simplified and quicker-ending game to the more exacting drawn-out battle characteristic of Go.  As in Go, the board is vacant at the start and the players play a stone alternately on any intersection of line.  The object is to get five stones adjoining in  straights line, either horizontally or vertically or diagonally.  Black moves first, and as in Go a stone remains on the point on which it was first placed.  If a player succeeds in placing four stones in a line open on three both ends, he wins because the opponent can block only one end, and then the fifth stone is placed on the other end.  This winning position can always be achieved if a player can place a stone on a point so that he forms two lines of three stones each, one of which can be maneuvered into an open four in a line.  The first move is such an advantage in Go Moku that I recommend that Black (in his first move) should not be permitted to place a stone on a point that forms two open threes simultaneously.

 

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AMERICAN WHIST =================

AMERICAN WHIST
BID WHIST
VINT
BOSTON
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Pinochle Many Variations
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Pinochle Many Variations
Two-Handed Pinochle
Two-Handed Doubling Redoubling
Auction pinochle
Strategy at Auction
CAD found
Partnership Auction
Auction pinochle without wido Individual play
Partnership Aeroplane Pinochle
Radio Partnership Pinochle

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Other Members of the Bezique Family

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The Bezique Family
Rubicon bezique
Two-handed sixty-six
Two-handed piquet
Imperial
Jass
Boo-Ray or BOURÉ

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The Big Euchre Family
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The big euchre family
Strategy of euchre
Auction euchre
Table of scoring points
Napoleon
Spoil five
Double hasenpfeffer
Ecarte
Three-card loo
Schafkopf

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The Heart Group
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Heart Group
Spot Hearts
Black Widow Hearts

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The All-Fours Group
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All-Fours Group
Shasta Sam
Auction Pitch Joker
Razzle-Dazzle

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Banking Card Games
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Banking Card Games
Black Jack, Casino Style
Black Jack Strategy
Pontoon
CHEMIN DE FER
CHEMIN DE PER must play
Baccarat Banque
Faro or farobank
ZIGINETTE
CHINESE FAN-TAN
Banker and broker
Red Dogs


Card craps
Lottery
TRENTE ET QUARANTE

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The Stops Games
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Stops Game
SNIP-SNAP-;SNOREM
ENFLE
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Skarney® and How It Is Played
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Skarney® and How It Is Played
Alternate Skarney
Skarney Singles
SKARNEY GIN ®
Skarney Gin Doubles

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Cheating at Card Games
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Cheating at Card Games
Professional Card Cheats
Nullifying the Cut
The Peek
How to Shuffle Cards

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Dice and their Many Games
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Dice and their Many Games
The Casino Game: Bank Craps
THE CASINO’S LPERCENTAGE OF BANK CRAPS BETS
SCARNE’S RULES FOR OTHER DICE GAMES
English Hazard
Hooligan
General
Double Cameroon
Partnership Straight scarney Dice
Scarney Duplicate Jackpots
Scarney Chemin de Fer

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Games Requiring Special Equipment
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Backgammon
Parcheesi
Hasami Shogi
Scarney
Follow The Arrow
Roulette

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Lottery and Guessing Games
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Lottery guessing game
Tossing Game
Race Horse Keno
Moko
The Match Game

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Glossary of Game Terms
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glossary
glossary1
glossary2
glossary3

 

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