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Introduction
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Games you Can Play
General Rules
Imperfect Deck
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Draw Poker
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Draw Poker
General Rules of Poker
Stander Hand Rank of Poker
Basic Draw Poker Rule
Draw Poker Variation
Low and High-Low Variation
Spit Card Variants Poker
Miscellaneous Draw Poker Variants

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Stud Poker
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Stud Poker
Five Card Stud Variation
Miscellaneous Stud Poker Variants
General Poker strategy
Possible Poker Hands
Paring your Hole Card

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Rummy Games
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Rummy Games
Six Seven Card Straight
PIF-PAF
Six Seven Card Knock Rummy
Coon Can
Five Hundred Rummy
Continental Rummy
Fortune Rummy
Kalooki (CALOOCHI)
PAN

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Gin Rummy =================

Gin Rummy
Standard Hollywood Gin Rummy
Jersey Gin

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Canasta
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Canasta
Variation of Canasta
Typical Four-Handed Score Sheet

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Bridge: Contract and Auction =================
Contract and Auction
Contract Bridge Scoring Table
Illustrations of Most Frequent
Minimum Biddable Suits
CONVENTIONAL LEADS
CHANCES OF VARIOUS SUIT
The Laws of Progressive Contract Bridge
The Laws of Duplicate Contract Bridge
Auction bridge

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Cribbage and How it is Played
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Cribbage how to Play
Strategy at Cribbage

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Casino
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Casino
Strategy at Casino

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Children and Family Card Games
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Family Card Games
Old Maid
Animals or menagerie
TWENTY –ONE

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Miscellaneous Card Games
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Miscellaneous Card Games
Briscola
Primiera
Scotch whist
Lift smoke
Preference
Grand
Crazy eights

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Solitaire and Patience Games =================

Solitaire and Patience Games
Single-deck solitaire
Decade
Auld Lang Syne
Klondike
Four Seasons
Beleaguered Castle
Trefoil
Poker Solitaire
Two-deck solitaire
Tournament
Multiple solitaires

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Chess, Checkers, and Teeko
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Chess
Checkers
Teeko
Standard Teeko Strategy
Start Teeko Game
Standard Checkers Law

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Parlor Games for All
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Parlor Games
Twenty Questions

Scarney Duplicate Jackpots

Scarney Duplicate Jackpots is one of the most thrilling and fastest action dice games ever invented. The object of the game is to win the jackpot by throwing the same three dice number total as did the previous shooter.

Requirements. Any number can play. It makes an excellent four-, five-, six-, or seven- person game. Three Scarney dice, a dice cup, and a set of gaming chips are used. Dead dice count zero.
Seating Positions and Turn of Play. To determine seating positions and turn of play, each player shakes the three dice in the cup and throws them onto the playing surface. The player throwing the highest three dice number total (dead dice count zero) takes any seat and is the first shooter. The player throwing second highest sits on his left and shoots second and so on. Tying players shoot again. Upon completion of a game, the right to start the next game goes to the winner of the game.
The Jackpot Ante. Each player, before the game gets started, antes (puts) an agreed upon equal number of chips into the center of the playing surface known as the jackpot. All players must ante in turn, starting with the first shooter and rotating clockwise.
The Play. The first shooter places the three Scarney dice into the dice cup and, after a proper shake, throws them onto the playing surface. There is no action for the first shooter on his first throw. He merely calls the total of the three thrown dice and passes the dice cup and the three dice with the same numbers face up toward the player to his left whose turn it is to play. From then on, the rules governing each shooter’s turn of play (one throw with three dice) are as follows:

  1. If the shooter throws (matches) the exact same number total as the previous shooter (the player to the shooter’s right) he calls “Scarney,” wins the game, and takes the jackpot. Example: The previous shooter made a total of 13 points (3, 4, and 6). Upon completion of his throw he passed the cup and three dice-with the 13 points face upto the next shooter. If the next shooter throws any three dice combination totaling exactly 13 points, he calls “Scarney” and takes the jackpot.
  2. If the shooter throws a lower number total than the previous shooter, he must put one chip into the jackpot for each point number below the previous shooter’s total. Examples: The previous shooter’s total was 15, the next shooter throws 10 and puts five chips into the jackpot. The previous shooter’s total was 16; the next shooter throws 4 and puts 12 chips into the jackpot. The cup and dice, with the same numbers upward, are passed to the next player.
  3. If the shooter throws a higher number total than the previous shooter, he simply passes the cup and dice with the total upward to the player on his left.
  4. If the shooter throws three dead dice, called craps, zero points is his score; each player except the shooter must put five chips into the jackpot. The shooter then passes the dice and cup to the next player. And so it goes, to the left, clockwise, from player to player, until a shooter wins the game and jackpot by throwing the exact same number total as did the previous shooter on his right.

Scarney 21 Up and Down

Anyone can learn to play the game in a few minutes, yet it is an unending source of entertainment for children and adults alike. Scoring is the direct opposite of that in Straight Scarney Dice. With the exception of big Scarney, only dead dice count. That is, the object of the game is to win the pot by bringing the players’ combined total of thrown dead dice to exactly 21 and then follow with a throw of numbers (no dead dice).


Requirements

  1. Any number may play, singly or in partnership. Needed are five Scarney dice, a dice cup, and a set of gaming chips. Score is kept by oral count.
  2. For seating positions and turn of play, see Straight Scarney Dice Rules of Play.

The Ante. Each player, before the game gets started, antes (puts) an agreed upon equal number of chips into the center of the table, known as the pot. All players must ante in turn, starting with the first shooter and rotating clockwise.
The Play. The first shooter begins by throwing five dice. If one, two, three, or four dead dice (called crap or craps) are thrown, they are counted aloud and put aside. The remaining numbers (dice) are thrown again. The shooter continues throwing, each time adding aloud each crap (dead die) thrown to the previous total. The shooter continues to throw the remaining numbers until he fails to throw a dead die. Whereupon, the dice and cup pass to the player on his left.

If all five dice show dead, either on the second throw or after any number of throws, they are added to the score and all five dice are thrown again by the same shooter; any subsequent dead dice thrown are added to the running total. And so it goes, until the shooter fails to throw a dead die and his final total score is the second shooter’s starting number. If the first shooter threw nine dead dice, the first dead die thrown by the second player is numbered 10, and so on. This continues until one player throws a dead die which brings the total to exactly 21, but the game does not end unless his next throw is comprised of numbers (no dead dice) .
If a dead die appears on the next throw, the total is 22. If two dead dice appear, the total is 23 and the shooter continues throwing and adding dead dice to the total until no dead die is thrown. Whenever a player’s starting number is 22 or more, all subsequent thrown dead dice are subtracted from the total until the shooter fails to throw a dead die. Example: If a player’s starting number is 25 and he throws a total of 11 dead dice and then fails to throw a dead die, the total number is now 14. To emphasize: Whenever a player’s starting total is 20 or less, all subsequent thrown dead dice are always added to his starting total. But when a player’s starting total is 22 or more, all subsequent thrown dead dice are subtracted from his starting total. If a player’s total reaches zero, his next thrown dead die is counted as 1, and the second dead die is 2, etc.

Chip Penalties. Whenever a player’s dead dice total passes the magic 21 mark, he must put one-chip into the pot for each dead die he throws below or above 21. Examples: The player’s starting number is 19 and he throws 6 dead dice for a new total of 25. Since he is 4 over 21, he must put four chips into the pot. The player’s starting number is 23 and he throws 7 dead dice for a new total of 16. Since he is 5 under 21, he must put five chips into the pot. And so it goes, until the end of the game. Note: Some players prefer to pay only a one-chip penalty for passing the magic 21 mark instead of one chip for each thrown dead die below or above 21. For this ruling to be valid, it must be mutually agreed upon by all players before the start of the poker game.

The End of the Game. 11te game ends when a player hits 21 exactly and then throws numbers (fails to make a dead die on his next throw). When this occurs, the player calls “Game,” is declared the winner, and collects the pot-except when big Scarney (any five of a kind including five dead dice) is made on anyone (single) throw. Big Scarney automatically wins the game and takes the pot, regardless of the dead dice total. Upon the winning if the pot, the right to start the next round and throw first goes to the player to the left of the previous winner.

Scarney Bingo Dice

Scarney Bingo Dice combines the psychology of Bingo, the probabilities of Poker, and the constant fascination of dice throwing.
Requirements. Any number can play. Needed are three Scarney dice, a dice cup, a set of gaming chips, and a standard 52-card deck of playing cards. Each player throws the three dice; the player throwing the highest score (dead dice count zero) takes any seat and is the first dealer and shooter. The player throwing second highest sits on his left and shoots second, and so on. Upon the completion of the game, the right to start the next game goes to the player on the left of the previous winner.

Preparation to Start the Game. The player who is to shoot first shuffles the deck of cards and puts them face down on the table to his right. The player to his immediate right cuts the cards. Next, the player who is to shoot first deals 16 cards one-at-a-time face up onto the center of the table forming four rows of four cards each (vertically and horizontally). The rest of the deck is set aside.
Value of the Cards. Kings count 13 points; queens, 12; jacks, 11. All other cards have their face values: tens, 10; nines, 9; eights, 8; sevens, 7; sixes, 6; fives, 5; fours, 4; threes, 3; twos, 2; and aces, 1. The suits (clubs, diamonds, hearts, and spades) have no value relative to each other and do not count.
The Ante. The player, before the game gets started, antes (puts) an agree upon equal number of chips aside known as the pot. All players must ante in turn, starting with the first shooter, and rotating clockwise.

The Play. Each player at his turn makes one throw of the three dice. When a thrown number or a combination of numbers (dead dice count zero) matches the value of one of the face-up cards, the player must turn it face down. A player can only turn one card face down at each turn of play. However, if two or more cards can be turned face down, the player may choose which card he will turn face down. Example: The shooter’s three-dice throw shows a 3, 4, and 6. With such numbers, the player may turn face down anyone of the following cards: 3,4,6,7,9. 10, or king (13), providing such cards are resting face up on the table. When a player throws a number total whose point value fails to match the point value of a face-up card, it is a no decision throw and he passes the dice and cup to the player on his left.
When a player throws Scarney (any three same numbers or three dead dice), he can elect to turn face down any face-up card he wants; or he can refuse to turn a card face down and pass the dice and cup to the next player.
When a player turns face down the fourth or last face-up card of any vertical or horizontal row, he calls “Bingo,” and receives one chip from each player. When a player goes bingo two ways by turning a: card face down, he calls “Double Bingo,” and receives a Double Bingo bonus of two chips from each player. When a player goes Double Bingo by turning a corner card face down, he calls “Double, Double Bingo,” and collects a bonus of four chips from each player. The players continue to throw in turn until one player turns face down the sixteenth or last face-up card resting on the table. When this happens the player calls “Bango,” wins the game, and rakes in the pot.

Scarney Speedy Bingo Dice

Scarney Speedy Bingo Dice is a very interesting variation of Scarney Bingo Dice and is recommended to players who desire a much quicker ending game. The same rules of play as for Scarney Bingo Dice apply with the following exceptions and additional rules:

  1. Any number can play. Four Scamey dice, a dice cup, a set of gaming chips, and a standard 52-card deck of playing cards are used.
  2. Any four of a kind (four same-numbers or four dead dice) made on anyone throw, known as Bingo, automatically wins the game and takes the pot regardless of the positions of face-down or face-up cards.
  3. Three of a kind and three dead dice count only their point value.
Scarney Black Jack

Scarney Black Jack possesses the hit, stay, and double down features of the Casino card game of Black Jack in addition, it offers the player a greater chance of participation with the throwing of the dice.

Requirements. Any number can play, usually as many as can sit around the playing surface. Two Scarney dice, a dice cup, and a set of gaming chips are used. The object of the game is to get a higher count (total value of thrown dice) than the banker- shooter, up to but not over 21. Should the player throw the dice and force his total over 21, he loses his bet and sacrifices any chance to beat or tie the banker-shooter.
Count Value of the Dice. Each dead die counts 10; each one (ace) counts 1 or 11 according to the discretion of the shooter; and each three, four; or six count their spot value.
Selecting the First Banker. To determine the first banker and seating positions, each player shakes the two dice in the cup and throws them onto the playing surface. The player throwing the highest total becomes the first banker and selects any seat he wants. The player with the next highest sits to his left and so on. Dice showing the word dead count 10. Once the seating has been arranged, each player, starting with the player to the banker’s left, places the number of chips he wants to bet in front of him. The banker, who accepts all bets within the limit, shoots against each player in turn. The player shoots first and the banker broker second. And so it goes, to the left, clockwise, from player to player, around the table.

Rules Governing Shooter’s Turn of Play. The shooter places the two Scarney dice in the cup and, after a proper shake, throws them onto the playing surface.

  1. When the shooter, on his initial throw, makes a natural black jack (a dead die and a one or ace), he calls “Black jack,” and it becomes the banker-shooter’s turn to play. If the banker-shooter also makes a natural black jack, it is a standoff or push. No one wins, no one loses. If the banker-shooter fails to throw a natural black jack on his first throw, the banker-shooter loses and pays the shooter at 2 to 1 odds.
  2. When the shooter’s first throw shows a count of 20 or less, the player may elect to hit (throw) or stand (not to throw). If he is satisfied with his count he says “Stand,” or “Good,” and passes the dice and cup to the banker-shooter.
  3. If he is not satisfied with his count and elects to throw to try and better his count, he can do one of two things he can either throw one die, called a one shot, or throw both dice, called a two shot. Examples: (a) The player’s first throw shows a 4 and a 3 for a count of 7. The player decides to take a two shot; he says “Hit the 7” and again throws out the two dice, which show a 6 and 4 for a new count of 17. (b) The player hits the 7 with a one shot which shows a 10 count. He has a new count of 17. (c) The player is satisfied with his count, As mentioned before, he says “I’ll stay,” or “Good,” and passes the dice and cup to the banker-shooter. (d) The player throws a number that forces his total over 21, which is called a bust. The bankers shooter collects the player’s bet and pushes the cup and dice to the next player.
  4. The Double Down. After his first throw, and at no other time, a player may elect to double his bet and make only one additional throw, which can be either a one shot or a two shot. This is known as a double down. The player must then double his original bet by putting up an amount equal to his original bet.
Rules Governing the Banker-Shooter’s Turn of Play

  1. The banker-shooter follows the same throwing rules described above for the shooter.
  2. If the shooter made a natural black jack and the banker-shooter fails to do so, the for his bet. If the shooter and the banker- shooter each throw a natural black jack, it is called a standoff or push, in which case no one wins. It’s a tie or standoff.
  3. When the banker has a count of 16 or less, he must throw again.
  4. When the banker has 17, 18, 19, or 20, he must stay he cannot throw again.
  5. When a banker has a count of 17 with an ace and a six-called “a soft 17”it is an optional play poker. He can elect to stay or throw at his own discretion.

Final Settlement

  1. When the banker’s count goes over 21, he must pay the player still in the game.
  2. When the banker’s count is higher than the player’s, he collects the player’s bet.
  3. When the banker’s count is lower than the player’s, the banker pays the player’s bet at even money.
  4. When the banker and the player have the same count, it’s a standoff or push, and neither wins.

Rules Governing the Bank

  1. After the first banker has been selected by the procedure set forth under “Selecting the First Banker,” he shall bank five complete rounds (five turns of play for each player).
  2. Upon completion of these five rounds, the bank shall pass to the player on the first banker’s left, and each five rounds thereafter shall move to the left clockwise.
  3. A banker deciding he no longer wants the bank may pass the bank to the player on his left before the completion of the five rounds provided there are no uncompleted bets remaining on the board.

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AMERICAN WHIST =================

AMERICAN WHIST
BID WHIST
VINT
BOSTON
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Pinochle Many Variations
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Pinochle Many Variations
Two-Handed Pinochle
Two-Handed Doubling Redoubling
Auction pinochle
Strategy at Auction
CAD found
Partnership Auction
Auction pinochle without wido Individual play
Partnership Aeroplane Pinochle
Radio Partnership Pinochle

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Other Members of the Bezique Family

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The Bezique Family
Rubicon bezique
Two-handed sixty-six
Two-handed piquet
Imperial
Jass
Boo-Ray or BOURÉ

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The Big Euchre Family
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The big euchre family
Strategy of euchre
Auction euchre
Table of scoring points
Napoleon
Spoil five
Double hasenpfeffer
Ecarte
Three-card loo
Schafkopf

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The Heart Group
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Heart Group
Spot Hearts
Black Widow Hearts

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The All-Fours Group
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All-Fours Group
Shasta Sam
Auction Pitch Joker
Razzle-Dazzle

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Banking Card Games
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Banking Card Games
Black Jack, Casino Style
Black Jack Strategy
Pontoon
CHEMIN DE FER
CHEMIN DE PER must play
Baccarat Banque
Faro or farobank
ZIGINETTE
CHINESE FAN-TAN
Banker and broker
Red Dogs


Card craps
Lottery
TRENTE ET QUARANTE

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The Stops Games
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Stops Game
SNIP-SNAP-;SNOREM
ENFLE
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Skarney® and How It Is Played
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Skarney® and How It Is Played
Alternate Skarney
Skarney Singles
SKARNEY GIN ®
Skarney Gin Doubles

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Cheating at Card Games
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Cheating at Card Games
Professional Card Cheats
Nullifying the Cut
The Peek
How to Shuffle Cards

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Dice and their Many Games
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Dice and their Many Games
The Casino Game: Bank Craps
THE CASINO’S LPERCENTAGE OF BANK CRAPS BETS
SCARNE’S RULES FOR OTHER DICE GAMES
English Hazard
Hooligan
General
Double Cameroon
Partnership Straight scarney Dice
Scarney Duplicate Jackpots
Scarney Chemin de Fer

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Games Requiring Special Equipment
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Backgammon
Parcheesi
Hasami Shogi
Scarney
Follow The Arrow
Roulette

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Lottery and Guessing Games
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Lottery guessing game
Tossing Game
Race Horse Keno
Moko
The Match Game

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Glossary of Game Terms
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glossary
glossary1
glossary2
glossary3

 

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