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THE “STUFF” OF WINNING POKER

THIRD STREET STRATEGY

FOURTH STREET STRATEGY

FIFTH STREET STRATEGY

SIXTH STREET STRATEGY

SEVENTH STREET STRATEGY

RULE FOR WINNING POKER

MORE RULES FOR WINNING POKER

TOURNAMENT TACTICS

CAN MAKE A LIVING PLAYING LOW TO MEDIUM-LIMIT POKER?

THE FINAL WORD

 

 

 

THE FINAL TABLE

If you have arrived at the final table with a short or medium stack against several tall stacks, you will need to put your patience to the test by waiting for the best situation possible to put in your money. 

If your back is to the wall and you’re down to only one or two bets, you will probably need to throw them in on a medium pair, three big cards, or a strong looking three poker-flush that is fairly live.

In very few seven-card stud tourneys do you ever ante yourself broke. The antes are usually small enough in relation to future bets that you can wait for a premium hand. But once you decide to make your final commitment with a short stack, put the heat on as early as possible. 

You hope to either eliminate players or to make your opponents put in their money early so that if you end up with the best hand, you can get full value from the pot. Holdem Poker Game with a short stack, it is a bad play to put in only the minimum bet when you know you will need to go all-in on a later street, no matter what your opponents do. 

Also, if you just call, the opponents left to act behind you can get away from their hands on fourth street, for example, without putting in any extra chips.

When the table is down to either three players or you are heads-up against only one opponent, you will have to do far more ante stealing than you have previously done.  You must also be prepared to put on the brakes more quickly because your opponents won’t continue to let you bully them without taking a stand. 

So if you get caught in a bluff or semi-bluff, be prepared to muck your hand quickly. If you are on a semi-bluff and get called, whether you fold on fourth street depends upon your style of play. 

If you are on a three-flush, for example, catch nothing at all on fourth street, and don’t have a frightening front, you are better off to pass, even if your opponent’s front also looks weak.  If he called you on third street with a small pair, for example, give it up if you can’t even beat that.

On the other hand, if you are semi-bluffing and catch a card that pairs you are gives you either a four-flush or a four-straight, you can continue to play the hand so long as you have overcards.

You may continue betting into your opponent, if you are first to act. If you’re against a very aggressive player, be selective about when you take a stand. 

If he seems willing to mix it up with you, you may try a reraise bluff or semi-bluff, although they are very risky moves. But if it looks as though nothing will slow him down, you should wait and try to pick him off with better cards.

Heads-up play requires a fairly accurate evaluation of your opponent. Poker is a fun game By this stage of the tournament, you should be able to read him rather well:  his style, what’s going through his mind, and so on. 

Remember that it takes far less strength to get involved in a pot heads-up than it does when even as few as three or four players are left.

“Raise  and take it” will probably become the order of the day with high upcard raising the smaller one.  Suppose the low upcard is a deuce and you have a jack showing.

You probably have a far greater chance of taking the pot with a raise than you would if the low card were an 8 and you held a 9.  When you have nothing at all, you are better off just passing.

There are two occasions when you can limp in heads-up rather than raise. One is with a marginal poker hand such as a 9 up against an 8.  if you have 7-10 in the hole, for example, you may want to take off a card. 

Although you are looking for that perfect 8, you might also c

atch one of your overcards and end up with the best pair.  Another time you may want to flat-call with such a marginal hand is when you hold a three-flush and only your upcard is higher than your opponent’s doorcard. 

You hope to either pair your high card or catch a fourth flush card.  If you don’t, you quickly give it up if your opponent bets into you.

Strong boards are often the key to whether to semi-bluff, bluff, or continue with a hand in heads-up play.  The ultimate in personal judgment is always required in deciding how to the tournament, you should be able to read him rather well: his style, what’s going through his mind, and so on. 

Remember that it takes far less strength to get involved in a pot heads-up than it does when even as few as three or four players are left.

“Raise and take it” will probably become the order of the day with the high upcard raising the smaller one. Suppose the low upcard is a deuce and you have a jack showing. 

You probably have a far greater chance of taking the pot with a raise than you would if the low card were an 8 and you held a 9.  When you have nothing at all, you are better off just passing.

There are two occasions when you can limp in heads-up rather than raise. One is with a marginal hand such as a 9 up against an 8.  If you have 7-10 in the hole, for example, you may want to take off a card. 

Although you are looking for that perfect 8, you might also catch one of your overcards and  end up with the best pair.  Another time you may want to flat-call with such a marginal hand is when you hold a three-flush and only your upcard is higher than your opponent’s doorcard. 

You hope to either pair your high card or catch a fourth flush card.  If you don’t, you quickly give it up if your opponent bets into you.

Strong boards are often the key to whether to semi-bluff, bluff, or continue with a hand in heads-up play.  The ultimate in personal judgment is always required in deciding how to best proceed with your hand in seven-card stud. 

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