1.Against All Odds

Introduction

Los Angeles poker classics

ESP

Bad Beat Poker

Pot-Limit Omaha

Spooky Hand

World Poker Challenge

Pot-Limit Hold'em Tournaments

Foxwood's Poker

Five-Star World Poker

World Series Of Poker-2000

World Series Poker Championship

2.World Series Of Poker Hands

Youngest World Champion

World Series Poker-1999

World Series Poker-1998

World Series Poker-2002

WSOP-2002

WSOP-1995

WSOP-1994

WSOP-1998

U.S.. Poker Championship-1999

WSOP-2000

WSOP's Winner-2000

WSOP-2003

WSOP's Record-2003

"Big One" in WSOP-2003

3.World Poker Tour

WPT-2002

World Poker Tour-2002

WPT's winner-2003

WPT-2004

WPT-2003

World Poker Tournament-2003

WPT's Event-2003

Foxwood's World Poker

Amir's Big Call

4.European Poker Tour

The Poker em

Poker In Amsterdam-1998

The Poker em-2000

Late Night Poker 3-2000

WHUPC-2003

5.Reading other Player's Mail

WSOP-1992

Tournaments Of Champion-1999

A Tale Of Four Bluffs

WSOP-2001

Commerce Casino-2002

No-Limit Hold'em Event-2002

 

 

 

Phil Misreads His Hand, Too!

In “Never Give Up” (see page 16) I wrote about the Bellagio’s Five Star World Poker Classic’s $1,000 buy-in pot-limit Hold’em tournament in December 2002, and how I ran $300, under the gun, up to $10,000 in one round, when the blinds were $100-$200.  What a  nice round of poker for me! I then told you that I eventually made the final table with the chip lead (over $60,000 in chips) along with Howard Lederer (who was a short stack), Daniel Negreanu, Jeff Shulman (short stack), Dennis Waterman (who finished number one in Card Player magazine’s pot-limit Hold’em poker games category in 2002), and unknown Brian Green.

            Jeff, Daniel, and Howard finished eighth, seventh, and sixth.  Howard later told me, “I was very surprised that this random group played so well.  Usually, when I don’t know the players at a table they make a lot of mistakes.”  Howard is right about this.  The players at the final table that day were playing some great poker event.

            When we reached the final three players, Dennis and Brian asked me if I wanted to make a deal.  I looked down and realized that I have $150,000 of the $276,000 in chips at the table.  I declined, but I did realize that a deal would have netted me over $40,000, when first, second, and third were $53,500, $26,700 and $13,300, respectively.

            As play continued, I was confident that I would eventually prevail.  At this point , a very interesting hand came up between Brian and Dennis.  Dennis raised it up with Ad-9d, making it $12,000 to go, and Brian reraised it, maing it $24,000 more with 8-8.  Dennis studied forever, and then made a very unorthodox move: he just called the bet.  After a flop of Js-6d-2h, Brian bet Dennis’s last $20,000, and Dennis “went into the tank” (he studied for at least two minutes poker basics).

            Finally, Dennis called the bet with his A-9 high low poker, no pair, no draw! Dennis was now all-in, but when the dealer dealt off a nine on fourth street, Dennis wound up winning the pot.  Was Dennis’s call here terrible?  No, it wasn’t, but if he felt A-9 was good, then, in my opinion, he should have put the money in before the flop.  At this point, I  thought, “There’s no way that this miracle ‘hit’ of Dennis’s could ever come back and bite me, could it?  Imagine the parlay: Dennis is all-in in bad shape, Brian has only $29,000 left.  There’s no way I’ll end up finishing third and get only $13,000.”

      A few hands later, Brian moved all-in with A-K, Dennis called with A-7 suited, and I called with 2-2.  Brian survived when a king hit the board on the flop.  A little while later, Dennis made a straight against me on the last card in a key pot, and now I was in third place in the chip count.

            With Brian beginning to raise a ton of pots, I knew it was just a matter of time before I picked him off in a huge pot high limit action.  So with the blinds at $2,000-$4,000, the following hand came up.  I limped in the small blind with Ah-4h, and Brian raised $8,000.   I called quickly, and the flop came down 5s-6h-Qh; I had flopped the nut-flush draw.  I checked, and then Brian checked.  The fourth card was the 10h, and now I had the nut flush! How to play it, though? Perhaps a small bet that looked like a bluff?  Yes!

            I bet out $8,000, trying to make it look like a bluff, and Brian fell right into my trap.  He said, “Raise the size of the pot.”  As he put his chips into the pot, I thought he had me covered, so I moved all-in lighting fast, and he said call (if I raised, it was than $10,000).  He flipped up his two black jacks as I said, “Nut flush.” His face hit the floor.  He had been overplaying his hands against me for tow hours, and now he was drawing dead for all the money, just as I had foreseen!

            Now I  had all the chips, and I was wondering how he could have put all of his money in two black jacks with this board, when it hit me.  I had the Ad in my hand, not the Ah! He had raised me $40,000 on the turn, virtually all of my chips, and I didn’t even look back at my hand! I had just called off all of my chips with nothing!  Talk about bad play poker card games: here I was thinking how badly Brian had played the hand, when it was I who had misread my hand Zoinks!

            Luckily, it turned out that I was still drawing live to a heart or an ace, and I was thinking, “I deserve to hit it, since both of these guys have outdrawn me, and I’ve played so great today.” (“Deserve” is a concept that someone wiser than I should grapple with.  In fact, I probably “deserved” to finish third for misreading my hand!) Anyway, the last card games was a blank, and I was eliminated and got $13,300.

            I kept thinking, I would have made over $40,000 had I taken that deal! Well, I didn’t have anyone to blame but myself this time. I wasn’t superunlucky; I had just flat out misread my spooky hand.

 

 

 

 

 

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6.From The Other Side Of Table

WSOP-1974

Commerce Casino-1999

WSOP-1999

WPT-2003

Bellagio Poker

Ladies World Championship

High Limit Action in houston

Commerce Casino's California-1999

Party Poker Million-2002

WSOP's Winner-2002

WSOP Seven-Card Stud-2000

Foxwood's Casino

Pot-Limit Hold'em Event

World Heads-Up Poker Tour

United States Poker Championship

7.Poker Hollywood Style

Chinese Poker

Bicycle Club Casino

Rounder's

Celebrity Poker

Hustler Casino

8.Cheesehead Poker

Poker in Madison

Bluffing

Sportsmen Club

Pot-Limit Hold'em At Nora's Bar

Big Game in Wisconsin

A GOLF STORY

ULTIMATEBET HAND

CHAMPION OF THE YEAR AWARD

TOP MOMENTS IN POKER

THE NEXT POKER WAVE