General concepts

Points of Play

Tournament Play

Fourth Street

Case I.  Both you can your opponent have started with good poker hands and you both catch bad.

1. What is a bad card?
    -->    10 or higher or a pair showing.

2. If, while on fourth street playing poker games, you catch a 10 and your opponent catches a king should you bet?
    -->   Yes, you are a significant favorite.

3. If you catch a king and your opponent pairs should you bet?
    -->   No, you are not even the favorite.

4. Why is that?
    -->   You will probably have to bet first from now on.

5. Should you bet a queen into a king or a queen into a pair?
    -->   Usually not for the same positional reasons.

6. What if your opponent bets his king into your pair?
    -->   You can profitably raise because of your positional advantage (unless you think that his three-card hand is much better than yours).

7. What if he checks his king into your pair?
    -->   You can bet (unless you think his three-card hand is much better than yours).

8. How far can you go with this concept?
    -->   Not too far, for example, a jack against a pair is about an even situation.

9. In general, if you both catch bad, is it worth a bet if you are low?
    -->   No.  (However an exception might be if you think your three card hand is much better than his three-card hand.  Another exception is explained in question No.12).

10. What is an exception to the above?
    -->   If your opponent is the type that will call on fifth street with a three-card hand even if you appear to have a four-card hand provided he called on fourth street poker.

11. Example?
    -->   You and your opponent each have three-card sevens and a queen.  If your bet will make him call on fifth street if you catch good and he catches bad, then you should bet.

12. In general, if your opponent bets and you have both caught bad is it worth a call?
    -->   Obviously.

13. What if there is a bet on fourth street and he catches good and you catch bad on fifth street.
    -->   Fold.

Case II.  Both you and your opponent start with good hands and you catch good and he catches bad.

1. Should you bet?
    -->   Obviously.

2. What if you have paired your hole card?
    -->   You should still bet.

Case III.  Both you and your opponent start with good hands and you catch bad while your opponent catches good.

1. What should you usually do?
    -->   Fold if your opponent bets.

2. What are exceptions to this?
    -->   There needed to be a double raise on third street, or your hand is extremely good in that it is low and very live.

3. What if you are in doubt in this situation?
    -->   Throw your hand away.

Case IV.  Both you and your opponent start with good hands and you both catch good.

1. If you have the lower board card, have to bet first, and have not paired what to you do?
    -->   There is no set way to play the hand.

2. What does this mean?
    -->   It means that you should mix up your play.

3. What are your options?
    -->   To bet, to check and call, and to check-raise.

4. Frequently do what?
    -->   Check and call.

5. Why?
    -->   It will make your opponents think that you have paired.

6. What good does this do?
    -->   It may allow you to trap someone very badly.

7. Example?
    -->   You check a 6-3 into an 8-4 and then just call.  If you make a six or seven low on the next card and your opponent catches bad, you have a virtual cinch and he might very well call you all the way.

8. Another advantage of this play?
    -->   Against players who are a little bit more aware of your trickiness you can call when you do pair and they won’t automatically think that you have paired.

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