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BIG-BET POKER CONCEPTS

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Why Play Pot Limit
Comparing Pot-Limit
Poker's Ten
You Playing Style
How Deep Are You
Taking The Initiative
Drawing Hand's
Psychology
Reading The Opponent
The Art of Bluffing
Betting The Bully
No Limit Play
All In Coups

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SPECIFIC POKER FORMS

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Using The material
Pot-Limit & No-Limit
Big-Bet Hold'em Q/A
Big-Bet Hold'em Q/A 5-10
Big-Bet Hold'em Q/A 11-20
Pot-Limit Omaha
Pot-Limit Omaha Q/A
seven card stud
Lowball Draw
Key Pot-Limit
London Lowball Q/A
High Low Split
High Low Split Q/A
Strip Deck Poker

 

“Knowing The Odds Is Vital”

       This game was first played at the Victoria Casino in London. It has spread out since then and is popular among those who enjoy fire-breathing poker. Each poker player antes £10 (it used to be £25) and receives two cards facedown and one faceup. The high card after the dealer must bet £25.    The  betting  then  goes   around in the usual manner. A second card is dealt faceup, then a third, and then a fourth. Finally, a card is dealt facedown. There is a betting interval after each card, and the best low hand showing must lead off on each card after the first betting round. The best hand is 6 4 3 2 A (not 5 4 3 2 A), as both straights and flushes count high. Since and ace is used as a low card, a pair of aces is better than a pair of deuce.

           Thus this I somewhat like the reverse of seven card stud high, without the added color of the out-draw possibilities created by straights and flushes. London lowball is very similar to the game of  “razz” as played in Las Vegas, but that is limit poker, and the  straights and flushes have no significance.

            The game, like five-card stud, has a limited strategy. It is extremely useful for this book as certain poker techniques can be explained with great clarity. In play, its great attraction is that it appears easy for weaker players to understand. Thus they don’t feel at a disadvantage. Moreover, in my experience, people play horribly, and this is more discernible than in any other game.
             This is a huge game. I wouldn’t play in the game during its heyday, because frankly I couldn’t afford to. I only joined in when they switched to half lowball, half Omaha. However, without making accounts, I suspect all my early winning were at Omaha. This was due to the staking system, the amount of money with which people started, and the fact I played badly particularly before starting to write this book.

             

Let us consider a ring game of eight players. The pot is £80. The high card must bet £25. The first low card that wants to play raises £125 more. One other player calls and the high card passes. The pot is £405. Card four there is a bet of £400 which is called, total pot £1205. Card five the bet is £1200; card six £3900, and there could be a river bet of £10,800.

£1000. Then player A makes the mandatory £25 bet. B raises and C calls. The pot is now £405. If D calls the pot will be £555. What is D to do if he started with only the minimum and wants to play? He may pass now or later, and thus D will gain some leverage for his money. The effect used to be that all the players banged in their money on third street or, at the latest, fourth poker street. The skill factor was relatively small. Since the table charge was £25 per hour, overall the loss rates to the house alone were substantial.
                Nowadays the ante is only £10. Most people follow my example and don’t raise the maximum at the start. In addition, few play with the minimum sum. On the other hand, the great attraction of the game, that mug punters were lured to it like moths to a candle, has sharply diminished because they have gone broke.

PRINCIPLES 

  • If you have a 10 or higher showing at card three and there are two or more players in the pot, you can pass blind. If you call, basically you must hit a valuable low card and all the others be dealt a turkey. The probability to win of each of you improving is about 50%. Thus you are 7-1 against catching both up. You are never given these odds. Even if it all comes to pass, you have only achieved a level playing field. Lowball is the only game I know where you can play perfectly passing blind.
  • If the high card has bet and everybody else passed, you should raise blind with a low card. He is going to need two low cards in the hole even to consider calling, and that is 3-1 against. This rule does not apply where somebody is high with an 8 or lower, or possibly even a 9.
  • Should you pass a raise if you were the high card with (4 A) K against (??) 7 ? If he is other than in a steal position, certainly. If he has made a mandatory raise, it is unclear. The problem is you may get sucked insidiously into a huge pot.
  • Don’t be frightened of letting a high card in, provided he must pay for the privilege. e.g. You raise small immediately after the high card with (7 3) 2. A player with a 10 calls. Now another low card raises. It is unnecessary to put the frighteners on the 10 by raising again. If he wants to play, basically the other low and you are splitting up his money. Of course, by all means reraise if you think the 10 will continue to come along for the full ride, but this would be really rare. Otherwise, the danger is he well hit a blank on fourth street and fail to throw all his lovely money away.
  • Playing passively with a good low at the start and failing to raise is poor poker. It is too easy to be outdrawn. Just a small raise is all that is necessary.
  • Card four: pass a hand such as (7 4) A J against (??) 5 7. If you call, you are hoping he has paired and the odds against this are 2-1. Even if you are correct, you are only a small favorite. Thus, London lowball conforms to the basic big-bet poker principle. Always pass in a situation where you are a small favorite or big underdog. 
  • (7 4) A 9 is more marginal against (??) 5 6. He may have paired, or if not, it is possible he has a four-straight. The holding of 2 3 5 6 isn’t that big a deal against your hand.
  • The decision whether to call with (3 2) 7 5 K against (??)2 8 4 is a poker one. He can be expected have paired up about a third of the time. If he has taken a great deal of heat early on against two or more opponents and later hits an 8, it probably hasn’t paired him. 
  • The rough 9 made (9-8 low) is a small underdog on fifth street against four cards to a 7.
  • The holding 5 4 3 2 is awful hand, because an ace or 6 make a worthless straight. A call constitutes a bluff. You can hit only an 8 0r 7 for a decent low.

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SPECIAL SITUATION

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Tournament Strategy
Shorthanded Play

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GENERAL INFORMATION

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Poker History
Business
Pot-Limit Rules
Dealing Big-Bit Poker
The House Charge
Ethics & Courtesy
Cheating
Internet Poker

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THE ODD'S

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Probability Concepts
Implied Odds Poker
Figuring The Odd's
Percentage Table
Odd's For Hold'em
Special Odd's Table
High-Low or Better

Bookmakers

 
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